Freak Out

 Psychedelic Rock Band The Peoples Mass smashing their instruments at a Freak Out in 1967.

Clark l; Woodward c; Foster r

 Psychedelic Rock Band The Peoples Mass smashing their instruments at a Freak Out in 1967.

Clark l; Foster c; Woodward r

 Psychedelic Rock Band The Peoples Mass smashing their instruments at a Freak Out in 1967.

Clark l; Woodward c; Foster r

 Psychedelic Rock Band The Peoples Mass smashing their instruments at a Freak Out in 1967.

Woodward l; Clark c; Foster r

The above images show The Peoples Mass engaging in a "Freak Out" in the back room of a now-demolished pub in Stockton-on-Tees called "The Shy Tiger", almost certainly in 1967.  A Freak Out was, in the words of lead singer George Brallisford, "Where we'd take lots of drugs and smash our instruments."  

In the photographs, Fred Foster is smashing a white Fender Stratocaster; Edward Clark a Hofner Violin Bass; James Woodward rocks a stack of speaker cabinets; George Brallisford is not seen, although it is possible he was the photographer.

Freak OutThe Peoples Mass
00:00 / 02:00

It is not conclusive that the above recording was made at the same Freak Out shown the photographs, although there is a strong possibility: as only one guitar is audible, the recording must have been made after the death of Frank Warnes in 1965; the events were not common due to the financial cost of destroying equipment. The following time points are of note:

0.00: The recording opens at the end of a performance of I Can Hear A Siren - we assume Brallisford left the stage in order to operate the tape recorder.

0.23: "Siren" has dissolved completely. Clark begins detuning his bass lower and lower.

0.46: Unknown person shouting "Help us!"

1.09: Woodward finishes playing, to some applause.  Unknown female audience member shouting. 

1.40: A distant, guttural scream. Both Clark and Foster smash their instruments.

1.40-1.59: Various shouts and laughs. Brallisford's voice is absent. 

1.54: Clear sound of a camera shutter.

Hartlepool musician Keith Montgolfier remarked, 'You expect it to be great, with all that noise howling around you, but when you [smash] your guitar there's no signal going through the pickups any more so it's just quiet!  What you didn't realise, when you saw The Who and Hendrix and all that lot doing it... they had someone round the back with another amp to keep the noise going.' (Interview with the Hartlepool Mail, 11 November 1985 link↗̱)